Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
Users Online: 119

 

Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Advertise Contacts Login 
     
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 310-312

Liver enzymes derangement and the influence of diet in animals given oral albendazole


Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Gabriel Olaiya Omotoso
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ilorin, P.M.B. 1515, Ilorin
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0300-1652.122333

Rights and Permissions

Background: Albendazole is used as an anthelmintic in the treatment of some parasitic infections. This study determined how the effects of albendazole on liver enzymes are influenced by diet. Materials and Method: Thirty adult male Wistar rats of mean weight 304.12 ± 11.34 g were randomly grouped into five: Group A: Control, was given rat pellets and water only; Group B received 15 mg/kg/d of albendazole while fasting; Group C received 15 mg/kg/d of albendazole with fatty meal; Group D received 15 mg/kg/d of albendazole with normal diet (rat pellets); and, Group E received 30 mg/kg/d of albendazole with normal diet (rat pellets); they were given orally for 3 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed thereafter and blood samples obtained for quantitative study of the serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Results: Significant elevation in the serum levels of the transaminases especially in animals which were on their normal diet (rat pellets), while ALP was either reduced or increased based on dietary factors. Conclusions: Oral administration of albendazole before meal or with a fatty diet could help limit severe elevation of liver enzymes associated with its use, while still ensuring optimal efficacy.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3352    
    Printed84    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded97    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal